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Amet Spring Motor: "On This Day..."


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"On This Day in Phonographic History..."

 

January 28, 1891:  Edward Amet filed for a U.S. patent for “Speed Regulator for Motors.”  This was the first patent issued on a spring-driven phonograph motor which would be offered to the public.

 

#antiquephonographsociety #phonograph #gramophone #antique

 

 

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Here is one of the earliest surviving Amet motors; this one with a single mainspring:

231917904_Ametmotor.jpg.69fe39f54f5a2d3001c16b89ca5c6f5d.jpg

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37 minutes ago, Martin_P said:

How often do these appear in the market?

 

About as often as Angelina Jolie has asked for my number.

 

George P.

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Neilvanstem

Laughing as I do not know this Angelina Jolie though the name is familiar. Amet sounds much more familiar!

 

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And if the original centrifugal governor wasn't odd enough.  How about this Amet governor - a combination of the early centrifugal design with governor balls!!!!

 

I believe there are 3 of this design of motor known!!!!


Shawn 

PXL_20210130_220048372.jpg

Edited by Shawn
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That's a beautiful image, KinetoGuy!

 

But the cabinet and lid look more like that which housed the early Macdonald motor (the one which powered the Type F, Type N, and Type AN Graphophones).  The Macdonald motor and cabinet could be purchased for $25.00, allowing owners of Edison Class Ms to convert their machines to spring motor operation.  The lid has the distinctive catches which are seen on the Macdonald/Graphophone cabinet lids, but not on Amet cabinets.

 

What is the small oval just to the right of the cabinet's center?

 

Those fellows were taking no chances of cylinder breakage!  I've never seen so much cotton in a carrying case!

 

Thanks for posting this wonderful image.

 

George P.

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George is correct.

 

It is the Macdonald Cabinet.  The Crank is a key tell tail sign.  As well, the "ears" (the parts that slip into the bottom cabinet to lock the lid in place) on the cabinet top are Columbia. Amet "ears" would be stubby and round.  Macdonald cabinets were made not only to convert Class M's to spring motor machines, but could accept a Bell Tainter top as well.  They were available from the Chicago Talking Machine Company. I've seen these set up for both Edison and Bell Tainter (interchangeable) or specific to one or the other.  Interesting to note, Bell Tainter top works and Edison Top works are driven in different directions.  In other words the correct rotation of the top works is clockwise on one, and counter clockwise on the the other.  So, on the interchangeable versions, the belt would need to be twisted or crossed to work successfully on one or the other top works. 

 

As to the spot, I've blown the picture up as much as I can.  I would love to report it is  a Chicago Talking Machine decal, which I have seen on these cabinets, but not enough detail to say definitively. As well, the shape is not reminiscent of a Chicago Talking Machine decal. 

 

Outstanding and important picture!!!

 

Shawn 

 

 

IMG_4342.JPG.1fec7b8ee3658cc822e15c309257412e (1).png

Edited by Shawn
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AudioAntique

Just received a call from Angelina!  :classic_tongue:

 

 

Here is another example.

This is a very interesting topic and Edward Amet being such a gifted inventor who was a pioneer in the industry.

 

 

20210131_114300-LR.jpg

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20210131_114948-LR.jpg

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KinetoGuy

Sorry about the erroneous Amet attribution to the phonograph in the photo and thank you for the wonderful information on what the phonograph really is...

 

I tried looking closely at the spot on the front of the case...unfortunately I will need to recruit younger eyes or something with greater magnification..it appears as if it is raised and it also appears as if there are letters there.... I will provide a follow-up.....

 

Also wishing now that I bough the Amet phonograph that I was offered some 20 years ago....!!!!!

 

Alan

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RodPickett
On 2/2/2021 at 1:48 PM, KinetoGuy said:

Sorry about the erroneous Amet attribution to the phonograph in the photo

From an Administrative viewpoint – no need to apologize on this Forum.  It is for open dialog and exchange of information.  Tactful and helpful feedback is always welcome.  Caustic or demeaning feedback will not be tolerated.  I made a similar error on a posting and received respectful feedback.

 

From a Collector’s viewpoint – what a fantastic collection of photos you have and thank you for your continued contributions.

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